Category Archives: Friends

Scenes from a Funeral

The burial of Michael Collins took place on August 28th 1922. It was the largest and most sombre of that era.

Weekly Freeman’s Journal 02 September 1922

From City Hall, Collins’s remains were taken to the Pro-Cathedral through streets thronged with thousands of mourning spectators, some occupying the windows of the buildings overlooking the street. Read more: https://www.rte.ie/centuryireland/index.php/articles/funeral-procession-for-michael-collins-one-of-the-largest-ever-witnessed-in-dublin

Tens of thousands people lined the route to Glasnevin Cemetery to pay tribute to Collins, as his cortêge made its ways through the city. It is said that 20,000 soldiers and civilians marched behind the coffin. The oration was given by General Richard Mulcahy before he was laid to rest among good and the great of who played their part in the course of Irish freedom.

Weekly Freeman’s Journal 02 September 1922

Sources

https://www.rte.ie/centuryireland/index.php/articles/funeral-procession-for-michael-collins-one-of-the-largest-ever-witnessed-in-dublin

Weekly Freeman’s Journal 02 September 1922

Michael Collins

On August 22nd 1922 a terrible news of Michael Collin’s untimely death began spreading around the country. His passing came days after the death of Arthur Griffith, another member of the Treaty negotiation team, again gone before his time.

Michael Collins and the media–then and now

Freeman’s Journal 24 August 1922

Dazed incredulity was the first sensation with which citizens heard the tragic news yesterday morning. But The grim announcement in black type was not to be gainsaid, and the horror of the thing dawned upon all in its full immensity It was as if everyone from the highest to the lowest, had lost an intimate comrade.

Freeman’s Journal 24 August 1922
Weekly Freeman’s Journal 26 August 1922

Sources

Freeman’s Journal 23 August 1922

Michael Collins and the media–then and now

Weekly Freeman’s Journal 26 August 1922

Dublin in Ruins

As the fighting in Dublin became more intense in July 1922 the city centre became a burned out ruin again, as it did like in the wake of the Easter Rising. One man, who fought on the side of Partrick Pearse, during the Rising told reporters; “I do not know what you think…bit I think that the action of the men responsible for this ruin has been a crime against the nation. It has no parallel with Easter Week.” He was not the only one dismayed with the destruction, the Archbishop of Dublin, the Lord Mayor and Douglas Hyde all made a tour of O’Connell Street when the fighting died down.

Many people also came out to view the ruins, some from the safer location of the platform erected around Nelson’s pillar for the funerals of the fallen. A big crowd turned out to line O’Connell Street for the military funerals, which made their way to Glasnevin Cemetery. “The dirge of pipers’ band announced their approach, and as the gun-carriage and five hearses moved past, the head were uncovered and the people stood in silent tribute to the heroic dead.”

Sources

15 July 1922 – Freeman’s Journal – Dublin, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

15 July 1922 – Freeman’s Journal – Dublin, Dublin, Republic of Ireland