Category Archives: Places

Emily’s Little Brother

One hundred and fifty years ago today Emily’s youngest brother John Jasper Joly Burke was born. Like his older sister and brother, Richard he his birth took place at Windsor Terrace, Edenderry, Co Offaly. He was the last of the four M’arthur-Burke children.

His early life was the same as his sister Emily, but there may have more emphasis on his education, simply because he was a boy. He probably attended a school for the sons of Clergymen, like his sisters attended the equivalent for girls. His brother, Richard became a banker, therefore it is possible that John Jasper studied for a profession too.

Some time in the early 1890’s he followed his sister Miriam, to Australia. Miriam remained in New South Wales, where she eventually married and had children. John Jasper went to Victoria, perhaps in search of work. There are no records to confirm, why he went there and exactly when until his funeral notice appeared in the local newspapers in May 1893:

The Friends of the late Mr. JOHN JASPER JOLY BURKE are respectfully invited to Follow his remains to the Bendigo Cemetery. The funeral is appointed to move from tho Fifeshire Hotel, Mount Korong Road, Ironbark, This Day, at ten o’clock. WILLIAM FARMER, Undertaker

Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), Friday 26 May 1893, page 4

It appeared he died in the Fifeshire Hotel, in Bendigo. Today it seems a bit mysterious that he died in a hotel, but back then people lived in hotels for an extended amount of time. Perhaps he had some temporary work there, as it was a mining area. As his death was not reported on it can be assumed that he died of natural causes. Perhaps a disease, brought on by the hostile climate, that he was not used of or something minor such as a fever, which can be easily treated and cured today. He is buried at Bendigo Cemetery in an unmarked grave Internment number 12656.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:BendigoFifeshireHotel.JPG

Sources

https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/civil-perform

27 October 1869 – Kings County Chronicle – Offaly, Offaly, Republic of Ireland

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/

Mattinbgn [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)]

With thanks to Bendigo Cemeteries Trust

Kathleen Florence Lynn

On this day in 1955 Dr. Kathleen Lynn was laid to rest in her family plot in Deansgrange Cemetery, Dublin. Dr. Lynn and Emily’s friendship spanned at least four decades, up till Emily’s death in 1952. Kathleen outlived her by three years. The two women had much in common, their lives taking similar courses. Both had careers in the medical field, Kathleen a doctor, Emily a nurse.

The coast of Killala, birthplace of Dr. Kathleen Lynn

Dr. Lynn graduated from the college. She was one of a small number of girls that won scholarships to the University of Dublin, where she began her medical career.

Dr Kathleen Lynn Lane, Ballina, Co. Mayo
Sources
Dublin Daily Express 29 June 1893

Fortunes and Misfortunes of Mary M’Arthur

As did Emily’s fortunes rise and fall during her life, so did her ancestors. In fact is was a way of life for them most of the time. Sometimes they were rich and other times they were plunged into financial ruin.

When Emily’s grandfather Richard M’Arthur died in 1829 leaving a wife and two small children under three, at least they were left as “fund holders”, as documented in a later census. However, as few years later Mary M’Arthur was back at ‘work’ in the old family business of selling books and stationary. Mary may not have had the same business sense as her mother, the resourceful Ruth Graisberry, who ran the family print business, for twenty years after her husband died.

In March 1854, the notice below appeared in Halifax Courier:

Halifax Courier 18 March 1854

It appeared that Mary M’Arthur was bankrupt. Somehow she paid her creditors. She did not live long enough to regain her ‘fortune’. She died exactly one year later.

Sources

https://www.findmypast.ie/transcript?id=GBC/1851/0013988887;1851 England, Wales & Scotland Census

Northumberland, Durham & Yorkshire, Slater’s Royal National Commercial Directory, Vol 1, 1854-1855

Halifax Courier 18 March 1854

28 July 1855 – Worcester Journal – Worcester, Worcestershire, England

Emily’s Brother; the Odd Fellow

Emily’s half brother, Dr. William Burke, was a member of the fraternity, the Odd Fellows. When he attended the Loyal Midland Lodge’s anniversary in 1883 he was admitted as an honorary member. He cited the same in the medical directories, perhaps to add prestige to his profile.

The Odd Fellows are, like the Freemasons and Foresters a friendly society that permits only male membership. When Emily’s brother was accepted into the fraternity in 1883, many of the medical profession were members. Reflected in the medical journals at the time, articles with titles such as “Friendly Societies And The Medical Profession. Statements Of The Friendly Societies, And The Facts As Ascertained”. There was also a air of distrust around such societies due to their secretive nature.

Provoked by the French Revolution, societies such as the Odd Fellows were classed as illegal. Informers sent in by the government were paid to infiltrate Lodges (branches). Secret signs and passwords were introduced to sort the real brothers from the imposters, as a matter of security. This tradition, which origin is not widely known is still used today, more as a tradition than necessity.

Late 18th century
Government suspicions of societies that ‘administer oaths and correspond by signs and passwords’ reached fever pitch, triggered by the French Revolution. So much so, organisations such as ours were deemed illegal and driven underground – exacerbating connotations of ‘secret societies’.

https://www.oddfellows.co.uk/about/history/
Image courtesy of Library and Museum Charitable Trust of the United Grand Lodge of England

How the Odd Fellows Became the Odd Fellows

There are several different reasons given for our strange name. One old and apparently authoritative history of Odd Fellowship gives the explanation, “That common laboring men should associate themselves together and form a fraternity for social unity and fellowship and for mutual help was such a marked violation of the trends of the times (England in the 1700’s) that they became known as ‘peculiar’ or ‘odd,’ and hence they were derided as ‘Odd Fellows.’ Because of the appropriateness of the name, those engaged in forming these unions accepted it. When legally incorporated the title ‘Odd Fellows’ was adopted.”

https://www.ballardoddfellows.org/history/

Sources:

https://iogt.org/about-iogt/the-iogt-way/who-we-are/the-history/

31 March 1883 – Barnsley Chronicle, etc. – Barnsley, Yorkshire, England

https://www.oddfellows.co.uk/about/history/

“Friendly Societies And The Medical Profession. Statements Of The Friendly Societies, And The Facts As Ascertained.” The British Medical Journal, vol. 1, no. 1956, 1898, pp. 1661–1662. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/20255058.

The opening of the Eiffel Tower and Emily’s travels in France

Today the Eiffel Tower turns 130. When unveiled first it was quite a marvel. “A Nineteenth Century wonder” it was called, but before Parisians saw it as a wonder to behold they were quite skeptical during construction. As one paper reported it was cited as a “Metallurgical Monstrosity.”

Emily visited France in the 1890’s she may have been to Paris taking in the spectacle of the newly constructed Eiffel Tower herself, or even may have a lift to highest point accessible to the public at at the time. It was in her character to do so as she was once described by a friend as “intrepid”. It is possible that she may have been to France at an earlier date as she spoke fluent French.

Sources

13 April 1889 – Fife Free Press, & Kirkcaldy Guardian – Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland Cambridge Daily News 03 April 1889